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Professor Simon Finfer, of The George Institute for Global Health, led investigators in this second study, which provided an important new analysis of the Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation–Survival Using Glucose Algorithm Regulation (NICE SUGAR) trial data.

Despite and perhaps because of the advances in biomedicine over the past few decades, chronic diseases, like heart disease, stroke, and diabetes are now rising in many places of the world and more worryingly they impose their heaviest burden on the poor and disadvantaged populations.

In 2002, 3.5 million people died of cancer in Asia. This is expected to increase to 8.1 million by 2020. As the death rate and prevalence of cancer hits hard in Asia, specific concerns have been raised about the economic toll of the disease on patients and their families. Ongoing treatments are expensive and can impose a considerable financial burden.

One quarter of the world’s adult population suffers from hypertension, and although it has no obvious symptoms, it can lead to heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. Despite this, there has been great uncertainty as to how intensively blood pressure should be lowered to obtain maximal benefit and minimize risks.

Una O’Brien CB, Permanent Secretary at the Department of Health, and staff from the British Embassy in Beijing visited The George Institute for Global Health, China’s offices in Beijing to discuss the health issues affecting people in not only China and the UK, but people all around the world.

Kidney failure shortens the life of affected people, reduces quality of life and is expensive to treat. Prevention is key, as relatively few treatments have been shown to be effective.

Much is made in the Western media of the growing global political and economic importance of China and India.  There is also much commentary about personal rights, financial inequalities and social dissidence.

International and local experts in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) converged on Xi’an in Shaanxi Province, China, last week for the Fourth Annual Chronic Disease Forum for the Prevention and Management of Chronic Diseases and a Health Policy Roundtable.

Lijing L. Yan joined the George Institute in 2009 because she wanted to help improve the health of people across the globe and to work with decision makers to really drive change to health practices and policy.

Professor Yan is currently the Director of the China International Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Deputy Director of the George Institute China affiliated with the Peking University Health Science Center.

Lijing L. Yan joined the George Institute in 2009 because she wanted to help improve the health of people across the globe and to work with decision makers to really drive change to health practices and policy. Professor Yan is currently the Director of the China International Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Deputy Director of the George Institute China affiliated with the Peking University Health Science Center.

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